G.L.B.T. THEMED MOVIES: GAY SEX IN THE 70s

SYNOPSIS:

Gay Sex in
the 70s is a 2005 American documentary film about gay sexual culture
in New York City in the 1970s. It illustrates the twelve
years of sexual freedom bookended by the Stonewall riots of
1969 (which largely removed the threat of police repression) and the
recognition of AIDS in
1981 (the dawning of the consequences of unprotected sex with multiple
partners). The film uses archival footage and interviews to describe the world
of gay anonymous and casual sex in
the settings of discotheques,bathhousesbars and dark roomsFire Island and more.

The film was directed by Joseph Lovett and features interviews
with Larry KramerTom BianchiBarton Lidice BenešRodger McFarlane,
and many others.

The film was awarded the GayVN Award for Best
Alternative Release of 2006.
REVIEW:

It was almost deja vu for me,
watching what lifestyle was like in those heady days of Gay sex in the 70’s despite the fact that was in 1978. I can’t explain it, but there is something so familiar about seeing what life was like for gay people back then.



This films actually shows you this was REALLY happening, not only in NYC but around the
world! This
is a very good archive of a time in history and valuable in today’s world.




It was fun to see
all the pretty young things in their heyday who are all past middle age, yet
knowing that they’d come a long way to get here. 
I enjoyed it and
highly recommend it to anyone who was/n’t around at the time.

Gay Sex in the 70s is a
stunning visual document of New York. Lovett expertly mixes archival footage and
interviews with those who lived through the times, including author/activist
Larry Kramer, photographer Tom Bianchi, and the former business manager of the
St. Marks Baths. From Greenwich Village to the Fire Island Pines, Gay Sex in
the 70s celebrates a city and an era with the unbridled joy that characterized
the decade, while at the same time offering a sobering reminder of the AIDS
crisis that followed

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